Research to maximise wind turbine potential

19 March 2013

Dr Francis Quail, Director of the Centre for Advanced Condition Monitoring at the University of Strathclyde (left), with Craig McDonald, SgurrEnergy Product Group Manager
Dr Francis Quail, Director of the Centre for Advanced Condition Monitoring at the University of Strathclyde (left), with Craig McDonald, SgurrEnergy Product Group Manager

Research examines technologies to meet renewable energy targets for Scotland and maximise the potential of wind turbines

Novel research, led by the University of Strathclyde, testing wind condition monitoring technologies is underway to monitor the condition of wind turbine drivelines, including remote sensors to detect how they are being affected by extreme wind conditions.
Engineers at the University are working with the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and Scottish Enterprise, developing technology for Strathclyde’s Centre for Advanced Condition Monitoring (CACM), a partnership launched in 2011 between the University, SgurrEnergy and David Brown Gear Systems.

The CACM aims to help to meet renewable energy targets for Scotland and provide cost-effective technology that maximises the potential of wind turbine operations.
 
The research testing will involve the deployment of wind measurement tool, Galion Lidar. Pioneered by Scottish renewable energy consultancy, SgurrEnergy, the tool is being used by researchers at the University to quantify the impact of specific characteristics of the wind, such as turbulence and gust structure, on key wind turbine components and turbine life.
Testing is taking place near Glasgow at SgurrEnergy’s test facility situated in Whitelee Windfarm, the UK’s largest onshore wind farm.
Offshore wind projects can be difficult working environments causing costs to be high. Quality information on wind farm performance can guide decision-making.
The partnership will allow industry to work with an academic research team to develop supporting information systems.
Estimates suggest offshore wind could be worth £65 billion to the UK by 2050, and could support hundreds of thousands of jobs.

Photo: Dr Francis Quail, Director of the Centre for Advanced Condition Monitoring at the University of Strathclyde (left), with Craig McDonald, SgurrEnergy Product Group Manager.


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