Protecting sensors, now & into the future…

Author : Simon Vogt | Chief Commercial Officer | P2i

01 April 2021

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Manufacturing a car is both highly complex & expensive. It requires thousands of parts, including between 60 & 100 high-quality sensors, with many built into the engine to ensure that the owner can identify & prevent possible issues before they result in breakdowns & expensive repairs.

The full version of this article was originally featured in the April 2021 issue of EPDT magazine [read the digital issue]. Sign up to receive your own copy each month.

And as Simon Vogt, Chief Commercial Officer at liquid repellent nanotechnology expert, P2i tells us here, sensors are now being deployed throughout the vehicle to meet evolving security and efficiency standards, as well as to address environmental standards.

Engine sensors measure voltage, fuel temperature, oxygen levels and much more, ensuring that the vehicle is operating at peak efficiency. Their use in today’s “connected car” is already highly extensive, and is set to increase exponentially. In a report last year, management consultants, Deloitte stated that by 2030, half the cost of a car will be accounted for by its electronics, of which sensors with semiconductors will be a major constituent part. Consequently, these sensors will need to be protected to prevent increased risk of breakdown. Both Deloitte and Gartner predict the use of non-optical sensors, such as environmental sensors, fingerprint, inertia and magnetic sensors, will increase at a compound annual rate of more than 7%. By 2022, the semiconductor content of a car will, on average, be $600, Deloitte calculates (although not all related to sensors).

The rise of advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) has already vastly expanded the range of applications for sensors. ADAS technologies are totally reliant on sensors to automate or assist with a multiplicity of driver functions, such as parking, blind-spot monitoring, safe braking and collision-avoidance. ADAS implementation, according to Deloitte, is growing at a rate of 24% a year.

This growth in the application of sensors will increase hugely with the switch to electric vehicles (EVs), which is by far the most significant development in the entire automotive sector. Governments in developed economies are now actively promoting the changeover. The UK government has, for example, forbidden the sale of diesel or petrol cars by 2030. EVs will require a multiplicity of sensors as part of a new approach to operation, maintenance and sustainability.

Looking further down the road, once autonomous vehicles have become part of our everyday reality, sensor technology will be as utterly essential as the electricity in their batteries. Without camera, radar and lidar sensors, these vehicles will be unable to function. Whatever the vehicle or its drive train, the problem remains that with many sensors necessarily exposed to the elements, something is bound to break, leak or need upgrading...


Read the full article in EPDT's April 2021 issue...


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