Supply chain lessons learned from fast fashion for electronics manufacturers…

Author : Oli Randell | Managing Director | Active EMS

01 March 2021

Active EMS_Lessons learned from fast fashion
Active EMS_Lessons learned from fast fashion

Fast fashion reproduces ideas from catwalk trends, celebrity culture & high-fashion designs as cheap, trendy garments for high street & online stores using low quality materials, low cost labour & mass production techniques. Its highly profitable goal is to get the newest styles to market as quickly as possible, where shoppers can snap them up at the height of their popularity, before discarding them after just a few wears.

The full version of this article was originally featured in EPDT's H1 2021 Electronics Outsourcing supplement, included in the March 2021 issue of EPDT magazine [read the digital issue]. Sign up to receive your own copy each month.

However, a popular apparel manufacturer in our region was recently confronted with the news that certain working practices at one of its subcontractors were unethical. After a social media campaign and threatened boycott, this news led to a dramatic fall in its share price. Here, Oli Randell, Managing Director at EMS (electronics manufacturing services) provider, Active EMS reflects on the lessons that electronics manufacturers can learn from fast fashion when it comes to sourcing ethically and transparently…

In the analytical light of today’s social media, that can be all it takes to sink a business. Companies can no longer hide shifty business dealings or obtain material from illicit sources. While this is a good thing, it requires extensive due diligence and transparency on the part of both the company and its supplier.

To be considered ethically compliant, it’s no longer enough to simply recognise your own company’s record for environmental responsibility. True accountability means also knowing your partners and their records for ethical sourcing and good business practices. Since so many end users are now acutely aware of business compliance guidelines, being affiliated with a substandard supplier can quickly damage your brand, your share price and your bottom line.

Additionally, any lack of transparency can be viewed with suspicion, with the assumption being made that there is something to hide. This applies not only to material sourcing, but to all aspects of business, including hiring practices and ethical treatment of employees. Once your reputation is damaged by a poorly chosen partner, it is difficult to recover, so being informed about your suppliers is a must.

Read the full article in EPDT's March 2021 issue...


More information...

Contact Details and Archive...

Print this page | E-mail this page