Seeing is believing

04 April 2017

Safety is a priority for drivers, as they need all the help they can get from vehicle manufacturers to ensure they have the total confidence required to give them the best driving experience and, most importantly, have the vision of their vehicle’s surroundings and situation.

Socionext has developed graphic SoCs that allow drivers to see what is around them and give them the confidence to make the right decision when starting up and driving off, turning left or right, or changing lanes on the motorway.

Driver assistance systems are the most important components of modern automotive industry. They promise to increase the safety of passengers and other road users alike. According to statistics, more than one million people die each year on the roads as a result of traffic accidents, and the main cause of these accidents is human error.  The primary task of safety-critical driver assistance systems is to reduce this figure and increase safety on the roads.  

Today’s driver assistance systems are based on various sensors such as ultrasound, camera, radar and LIDAR sensors.  Cameras have a big advantage over other sensors as they are based on the same principle as our eyes and can take in much more information. Camera-based driver assistance systems are designed either for human vision or for machine vision. Human vision systems such as reversing cameras or surround view systems show the driver a scene on a screen, scenes which need to be clear and precise.

SoCs for automotive displays
Socionext has graphic controllers which are specifically designed for automotive camera systems, such as the MB861Rx Family which combines an ARM Cortex A9 processor with an ARM NEON SIMD engine, a programmable graphic shader, graphic processor unit and a Socionext image processor. With parallel video inputs HD quality is achieved. This SoC family supports RAM up to 1GByte as well as NOR and NAND flash. The 2D graphics engine SEERIS is supported in parallel with the Socionext 3D graphics processor. The 3D core delivers optimised performance and the 2D engine delivers automatic 2D operation, making this a flexible chip architecture and supplying graphics with different frame rates and resolutions simultaneously. The multi-layer concept with up to 8 graphical layers per display controller output is a definite advantage in automotive applications. With a single SoC device, all the requirements for modern display applications can be met. A very flexible data display is possible when changing from one display scenario to another with high data throughput and fast frame rates being supported by the architecture of the internal device.



APIX2 inside
Socionext’s MB88F33x family of graphic controllers feature an integrated APIX2 interface to ensure high-speed connection for video and control signals. With APIX2, two bi-directional sideband channels as well as the main channel are available for high speed transmission of image and control data. The MB86R91 APIX companion chip has been specifically developed for automotive use as a communications and video bridge to interconnect the growing number of in-car displays with consumer grade chips, while at the same time reducing costs. The APIX companion chip enables the connection of modern high-performance application processors via various standard interfaces, such as single or dual OpenLDI flat panel display links and DRGB888. The fully integrated high speed APIX2 transmitters, with a downlink data rate of 3 Gbps and an uplink data rate of 187.5 Mbps, allow up to three high-resolution remote displays to be connected in parallel.

Typical automotive resolutions of up to 1920x720 pixels with 24-bit colour depth per connection are supported, as is the transmission of touch information. The connections offer flexibility, allowing a system architecture to use different resolutions and the integrated APIX2 receiver enables the connection of a video source whose input can be forwarded for processing to the application processor.

Safety 
Using controllers with integrated APIX2 means that applications are monitored and therefore the integrity of the information on the display is guaranteed.  These APIX links are used whenever displays or cameras are to be reliably connected to Electronic Control Units, typically for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems. Being able to see clearly is key for the driver and for that Socionext has developed the MB86R2x Family of SoCs. 

This family is based on the ARM Cortex A9 dual core CPU with 600 MHz and supports open standard interfaces such as OpenGL ES2.0.  Developed as an SoC solution for embedded high-end graphic applications, the MB86R24 module combines graphic processors, CPUs, a memory controller and energy management unit, and it supports 360o video/image processing technology. It comes equipped with 6 Full HD capture input channels and 3 display output channels, which gives flexibility for input/output control. The family variants incorporate two 533MHz microprocessor cores for very high performance.

Using this graphics controller with four cameras mounted onto a vehicle gives drivers 360o all-around visibility. Sophisticated 3D algorithms combine the images of the four cameras to create clear 360o vision in real-time. The MB86R24 architecture is optimised to handle all function blocks simultaneously so that there are practically no gaps in performance with simultaneous rendering of independent 2.5D and 3D graphics. This chip also features an ‘Approaching Object Detection’ functionality installed so drivers do truly have 360o vision around their car. Using this wrap around view system, drivers are able to check their entire surroundings in 3D from any desired angle. 

Until now, display of information on multiple screens had to be controlled independently for each screen; but now the MB86R24 consolidates and provides centralised control over a variety of on-board vehicle information units.

Once the chip has collected all the data from the cameras and other connected devices, its next function is to bring the information to the correct screen. This is where the display controllers come in and decide which camera information and which graphics go to the relevant display screen.  Everything is in real-time so that drivers have a vision of what is happening in the traffic around them.
<quote 1> According to statistics, more than one million people die each year on the roads as a result of traffic accidents, and the main cause of these accidents is human error.

<quote 2> Cameras have a big advantage over other sensors as they are based on the same principle as our eyes and can take in much more information.Socionext has developed graphic SoCs that allow drivers to see what is around them and give them the confidence to make the right decision when starting up and driving off, turning left or right, or changing lanes on the motorway.

Driver assistance systems are the most important components of modern automotive industry. They promise to increase the safety of passengers and other road users alike. According to statistics, more than one million people die each year on the roads as a result of traffic accidents, and the main cause of these accidents is human error.  The primary task of safety-critical driver assistance systems is to reduce this figure and increase safety on the roads.  

Today’s driver assistance systems are based on various sensors such as ultrasound, camera, radar and LIDAR sensors.  Cameras have a big advantage over other sensors as they are based on the same principle as our eyes and can take in much more information. Camera-based driver assistance systems are designed either for human vision or for machine vision. Human vision systems such as reversing cameras or surround view systems show the driver a scene on a screen, scenes which need to be clear and precise.

SoCs for automotive displays
Socionext has graphic controllers which are specifically designed for automotive camera systems, such as the MB861Rx Family which combines an ARM Cortex A9 processor with an ARM NEON SIMD engine, a programmable graphic shader, graphic processor unit and a Socionext image processor. With parallel video inputs HD quality is achieved. This SoC family supports RAM up to 1GByte as well as NOR and NAND flash. The 2D graphics engine SEERIS is supported in parallel with the Socionext 3D graphics processor. The 3D core delivers optimised performance and the 2D engine delivers automatic 2D operation, making this a flexible chip architecture and supplying graphics with different frame rates and resolutions simultaneously. The multi-layer concept with up to 8 graphical layers per display controller output is a definite advantage in automotive applications. With a single SoC device, all the requirements for modern display applications can be met. A very flexible data display is possible when changing from one display scenario to another with high data throughput and fast frame rates being supported by the architecture of the internal device.



APIX2 inside
Socionext’s MB88F33x family of graphic controllers feature an integrated APIX2 interface to ensure high-speed connection for video and control signals. With APIX2, two bi-directional sideband channels as well as the main channel are available for high speed transmission of image and control data. The MB86R91 APIX companion chip has been specifically developed for automotive use as a communications and video bridge to interconnect the growing number of in-car displays with consumer grade chips, while at the same time reducing costs. The APIX companion chip enables the connection of modern high-performance application processors via various standard interfaces, such as single or dual OpenLDI flat panel display links and DRGB888. The fully integrated high speed APIX2 transmitters, with a downlink data rate of 3 Gbps and an uplink data rate of 187.5 Mbps, allow up to three high-resolution remote displays to be connected in parallel.

Typical automotive resolutions of up to 1920x720 pixels with 24-bit colour depth per connection are supported, as is the transmission of touch information. The connections offer flexibility, allowing a system architecture to use different resolutions and the integrated APIX2 receiver enables the connection of a video source whose input can be forwarded for processing to the application processor.

Safety 
Using controllers with integrated APIX2 means that applications are monitored and therefore the integrity of the information on the display is guaranteed.  These APIX links are used whenever displays or cameras are to be reliably connected to Electronic Control Units, typically for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems. Being able to see clearly is key for the driver and for that Socionext has developed the MB86R2x Family of SoCs. 

This family is based on the ARM Cortex A9 dual core CPU with 600 MHz and supports open standard interfaces such as OpenGL ES2.0.  Developed as an SoC solution for embedded high-end graphic applications, the MB86R24 module combines graphic processors, CPUs, a memory controller and energy management unit, and it supports 360o video/image processing technology. It comes equipped with 6 Full HD capture input channels and 3 display output channels, which gives flexibility for input/output control. The family variants incorporate two 533MHz microprocessor cores for very high performance.

Using this graphics controller with four cameras mounted onto a vehicle gives drivers 360o all-around visibility. Sophisticated 3D algorithms combine the images of the four cameras to create clear 360o vision in real-time. The MB86R24 architecture is optimised to handle all function blocks simultaneously so that there are practically no gaps in performance with simultaneous rendering of independent 2.5D and 3D graphics. This chip also features an ‘Approaching Object Detection’ functionality installed so drivers do truly have 360o vision around their car. Using this wrap around view system, drivers are able to check their entire surroundings in 3D from any desired angle. 

Until now, display of information on multiple screens had to be controlled independently for each screen; but now the MB86R24 consolidates and provides centralised control over a variety of on-board vehicle information units.

Once the chip has collected all the data from the cameras and other connected devices, its next function is to bring the information to the correct screen. This is where the display controllers come in and decide which camera information and which graphics go to the relevant display screen.  Everything is in real-time so that drivers have a vision of what is happening in the traffic around them.


Print this page | E-mail this page